Tag: refugees

14Jan

ONE YEAR LATER: Entrepreneurship In Exile Insights into Syrian Refugees Startups – Jordan

A year ago, I published the Entrepreneurship in Exile study was published to focuses on Syrian entrepreneurs who were forced to leave Syria and become immigrants and refugees in host countries. Built on data from a study examining Syrian entrepreneurs’ views and experiences over 12 months of research, during which 156 interviews were conducted and ten open discussions as well as a series of interviews with entrepreneurial experts. Year after, I wanted to do a revisit on the report and examine the main challenges that faced the entrepreneurs and see what this year has reflected on the Syrian refugees in Jordan.

Read the full study

The Jordan Compact was game-changing to turn the refugee crisis into an economic opportunity by focusing on labor market reform, boosting trade, and attracting investment. The Compact crowded in concessional financings and beyond-aid incentives, like trade concessions that relaxed rules of origin (ROO) to export to Europe, to support inclusive growth for Jordanians and Syrian refugees alike.

The government has taken many steps to allow the refugees in camps like Zaatari to register home-based businesses in all sectors. Furthermore, grantee the Syrians who are living outside the camps the right to register home-based businesses in only the food processing, handicrafts, and tailoring sectors while maintaining 100 percent ownership. However, between January 1, 2016, and March 31, 2019, only 139,002 work permits were awarded, and currently, 38,000 refugees have active permits.

During last year, Jordan has collaborated with the international community, including the European Union and the World Bank, to strengthen the self-reliance of refugees and host communities, which includes training programs and support for creating job opportunities for Syrian refugees. The deal has allowed the country to access grants and financing package.

Jordan’s Startup ecosystem observe many improvements in the past years, especially in 2019 Jordan, implemented critical economic reforms. For the first time, Jordan has been selected among the top 3 business climate improvers by jumping an unprecedented from 29 ranks in the 2020 Doing Business rankings, according to the World Bank Group’s Doing Business 2020 report. Moreover, Jordan is a host to various incubators and accelerators and is one of the region’s most giant magnets of venture capital and equity funds.

Syrian refugee entrepreneurs benefited from those improvements and support as several new entrepreneurial programs have been established, focusing on small business and startup advancements and training. 

Through examing the challenges facing the Syrian entrepreneurs living in Jordan, the finding indicated a slight improvement. Banking and financial services limitations and Psycho-social Background & Trauma have been easied. While in contrast, challenges social exclusion and complex regulatory policies have become much harder. Travel Restrictions and are still the number one challenge for the Syrian refugees in Jordan.  

THE AVERAGE TOP REFUGEES’ STARTUP CHALLENGES IN Jordan ON BOTH 2018 AND 2019
ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN EXILE
7Jan

ONE YEAR LATER: Entrepreneurship In Exile Insights into Syrian Refugees Startups – Lebanon

A year ago, I published the Entrepreneurship in Exile study was published to focuses on Syrian entrepreneurs who were forced to leave Syria and become immigrants and refugees in host countries. Built on data from a study examining Syrian entrepreneurs’ views and experiences over 12 months of research, during which 156 interviews were conducted and ten open discussions as well as a series of interviews with entrepreneurial experts. Year after, I wanted to do a revisit on the report and examine the main challenges that faced the entrepreneurs and see what this year has reflected on the Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

Read the full study

Lebanon has a long history of protracted economic crises. The country of 10,452 square kilometers has a population of nearly 6.5 million people, including almost one million Syrian refugees. The long-standing gap Solutions have indeed been put forward by successive governments, but they have done little to bridge that gap in the market. Lebanon needs to create six times more jobs than it currently does to accommodate the 23,000 people who join the waiting list every year. 1 Read More »

3Dec

Is e-work the solution to the refugees employment crisis?

Opportunities for refugees to work remotely are mostly centered around the tech sector. Most opportunities that are available are in e-commerce, programming, software and mobile app development, digital marketing, graphic design, translation, and data analysis. Refugees have also been employed remotely in nontechnical sectors such as online tutoring and translation. 

This type of job, which remains widely untapped, provides one more option and a positive advantage for young refugees who have just finished their studies and are looking for their first experience. It allows them to work as contractors or freelancers on a project basis. Online work provides flexibility and can introduce one to new clients from anywhere in the world, opening up new possibilities depending on the field of expertise.

In Lebanon and Jordan, Syrian refugees only have the right to work and acquire work permits in limited sectors (for example, agriculture and construction). In Turkey, while Syrian refugees are allowed to work in any sector, employment is restricted by a quota set by the government (one Syrian for every ten Turks). According to “An Examination of Remote Work for Refugees” report.
Read More »

4May

Despite The Struggles, Many Syrian Refugees Started their Own Businesses in Exile

.

Syrian entrepreneurs, like the wider population of Syria, have fled the country to seek sanctuary around the world. Having taken their ideas and ambitions with them, they have met with mixed success in their new homes. Some have managed to create new startups and thrive in innovation-friendly environments, while others have grappled with a range of challenges that make it harder for small and medium-sized enterprises to get off the ground.

In my recent book “Entrepreneurship in Exile” which examed hundred Syrian refugees entrepreneurs’ views and experiences. I have heard direct from founder from Turkey to Jordan, Germany, and Canada, we heard about the people who took a step and made a decision. They left behind a country, a home, a memory, and took their journey to the unknown. They settled in their new home, started a business, became employers and contributed to the local economy.

The results were incredible, despite the severe conditions in which refugees and immigrants live, they have shown incredible strength and resilience. Many have worked hard to achieve their ambitions, becoming a refugee and immigrant entrepreneur.

Read More »

21Aug

Refugees Are Not A Burden; They Are An Opportunity!

 

Given that the act of picking up and moving to another country is an inherently brave and risky decision, it should be of no surprise that refugees and immigrants have repeatedly been found to be more entrepreneurial than locals.

Economic activities of refugees are generally heavily restricted by legal constraints, including limitations on movement, no labour market access or only partial access, and denial of financial and nonfinancial services for entrepreneurs.

Dealing with the refugee crisis is a huge challenge, and it should involve people from both host and refugee communities working together to create greater opportunities. We need to breakdown walls between people and build an inclusive and collaborative community and exchange of time, experiences and expertise in order to achieve mutually beneficial results.

Refugees are more likely to start businesses than locals. They are hungry to succeed, which has more to do with playing to win and less to do with playing with percentages. It is a survival game.

Read More »

19Jul
blockchain could help the refugee

Three Issues With Which The Blockchain Could Help The Refugee Community

 

The underlying technology of the bitcoin “blockchain” has become a significant invention of our time, with high potential to disrupt a large number of today’s industries and change the lives of many, including the refugee community. Blockchain technology can help save the lives of millions of refugees by solving some of the most critical problems they face. Here are three ways the blockchain could help refugee and tackle these issues:

Read More »

© 2018 Ahmad Sufian Bayram Blog | Creative Commons (BY-SA 3.0) Some rights reserved